South Jersey Eye Associates | Eyecare & Eyewear
South Jersey Eye Associates | Eyecare & Eyewear

Author Archives: SJ Eye


January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. Start the New Year Off Right.

As you plan for a healthier new year, why not add this sight-saving exercise to your list of resolutions: Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam. It’s the only way to find out for sure whether you have glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness in America.

An eye disease that can rob you of your vision, glaucoma often comes with no early warning. No pain. No discomfort. No blurry vision. Nearly 3 million people have glaucoma, yet half don’t know they have it.

Glaucoma starts with a buildup of fluid that increases the pressure in your eye and can cause damage to the optic nerve, the bundle of nerve fibers that transfers visual images to your brain. Glaucoma first affects your peripheral, or side, vision. As the disease advances, more noticeable vision loss will occur, and if not controlled, the disease can lead to permanent vision loss and blindness.

Are you at higher risk for glaucoma? You could be if you:

• Are African American and age 40 or older
• Are over age 60, especially if you are Hispanic/Latino
• Have a family history of the disease

Everyone, especially those at higher risk, should make it a point to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam every year as recommended by your doctor here at South Jersey Eye Associates. Early detection and treatment are the best ways to control glaucoma.

This year, make a resolution for healthier vision. Make sure your eyes are healthy and you are seeing your best in the new year. Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam and encourage your friends and loved ones to do the same.

This message is provided with the support National Eye Health Education Program.

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Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam to see well for a lifetime

Aging is a process that brings about many opportunities and changes, from major transformations, such as becoming a grandparent or going back to school to simple lifestyle changes, such as starting a new exercise program. Don’t miss out on any of these opportunities. Take stock of your eye health to make sure your eyes are healthy and you are seeing your best.

While vision loss and blindness are not a normal part of aging, some vision changes such as losing focus, having trouble distinguishing between colors such as blue and black, and needing more light to see well are common. These changes can often be corrected with contact lenses or glasses and improved lighting.

People are also at higher risk for vision loss from certain eye diseases and conditions as they age, including the following:

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which gradually destroys the macula (the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision)
  • Cataract, a clouding of the lens in the eye
  • Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that damages blood vessels in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye)
  • Glaucoma, a group of diseases that can cause uid and pressure to build up in the eye and damage the optic nerve
  • Low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected by regular glasses, contact lenses, medication, or surgery that interferes with the ability to perform everyday activities
  • Dry eye, a condition that occurs when the eye does not produce tears properly or when tears evaporate too quickly

September is Healthy Aging® Month

For more information, visit www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye

A program of the National Institutes of Health

Solar Eclipse Safety: American Optometric Association Encourages Safe and Fun Viewing of August Eclipse

South Jersey Eye Associates, PA Wants to Help You Take in the Stellar Moment

On August 21, a total solar eclipse will touch the U.S. mainland for the first time since 1979, following a path that crosses the country from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Tens of millions of people who live within a 70-mile radius of its cross-country track will witness the eclipse in totality (the sun completely blocked by the moon) while millions of others outside of it will enjoy a partial eclipse. The American Optometric Association (AOA), America’s family eye doctors, is urging Americans to view the eclipse with proper eye protection to avoid any temporary or permanent eye damage from the sun.

“The eclipse is a rare moment that the whole country is able to share,” said Dr. Brandon Wuzzardo.

“As America’s primary eye health and vision care experts, doctors of optometry like ourselves are excited to help everyone enjoy it safely by protecting their eyes,” added Dr. Michael Feinstein.

To ensure spectators won’t miss the remarkable sight, the AOA is sharing a few tips for safe viewing:

  • Get centered and enjoy the view. Within the path of totality, you can safely witness the two or more minutes when the moon completely covers the sun with the naked eye. Otherwise, your eyes should always be protected by verified viewing tools. Never look directly at the sun without eye protection, even briefly. Visit aas.org to access eclipse duration charts.
  • Know your duration. Outside of the path of totality, always use solar filters. O.D.s want to reinforce that the only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters or other ISO-certified filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers. The AOA encourages ordering solar eclipse glasses in advance and recommends referring to the American Astronomical Society’s (AAS) site for a list of manufacturers.
  • Be aware of harmful solar exposure. If you stare at the sun without protection, you may experience damage to your retina (the tissue at the back of your eye) called “solar retinopathy.” This damage can occur without any sensation of pain, since the retina does not have pain receptors. The injury can be temporary or permanent. Visit your local doctor of optometry immediately if an accident occurs.
  • Visit your doctor of optometry. Check in with South Jersey Eye Associates at 856-455-5500 or visit southjerseyeye.com for information about safely viewing the eclipse. If you experience any problems with your eyes or vision after the eclipse, our office will be able to provide you with the medical care you need.

To access additional information and educational materials on the solar eclipse, visit aoa.org/2017eclipse.

 

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Dr. Wuzzardo Completes Bike-A-Thon

On Sunday, June 11, 2017, South Jersey Eye Associates very own Dr. Brandon Wuzzardo and his girlfriend Kayla participated in the American Cancer Society Bike-a-thon, riding from Philadelphia to Atlantic City. Both are shown here, post-race, on the boards of AC. Congratulations Dr. Wuzzardo and Kayla on a job well done for such a worthy cause!

If you wish to donate to Dr. Wuzzardo’s team #StormtheHeavens, click here:
http://community.acsevents.org/site/TR?fr_id=83852&pg=entry

Technology At Its Best, At South Jersey Eye Associates

South Jersey Eye Associates continues to boast some of the most advanced diagnostic and surgical technology available for its family of patients, all close to home.

SJEA takes great pride in being the ONLY vision care facility in South Jersey to offer the advanced capabilities of the eidon, True Color Confocal Scanner from Centervue.

Engineered and produced in Italy, the eidon is able to produce high quality retinal images with increased sharpness, incredible optical resolution and greater contrast for jaw-dropping clarity. The eidon difference helps SJEA better detect preventable disease and preserve our patient’s quality of vision.

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Dr. Wuzzardo to Ride in Bridge to Beach Bike-A-Thon

South Jersey Eye Associates’ very own Dr. Brandon Wuzzardo, and his girlfriend Kayla, will be participating in the American Cancer Society’s 2017 Bike-a-thon Bridge to Beach (Philadelphia to Atlantic City) on Sunday, June 11th.

The Bike-a-thon is more that just a fund raiser. It’s a chance for caring people in a community to come together to support each other. And support is crucial for those who have been touched by cancer. At the American Cancer Society, the funds raised through Bike-a-thon not only go to research, advocacy, and education, but also for vital programs and services that give people hope and answers.

If you would like to support Dr. Wuzzardo and his team (#Stormtheheavens), you can donate by clicking here: DONATE TODAY

It’s Healthy Vision Month! Make Your Vision Last a Lifetime.

When it comes to our health, we often visit our doctor or nurse regularly to make sure our bodies are healthy. But what about our eyes? They’re not always top of mind, but they’re just as important.

During Healthy Vision Month, held each May, the National Eye Institute (NEI) reminds you to make your eye health a priority and encourages you to take important steps to protect your sight.

Get a dilated eye exam. Getting a dilated eye exam is the only way to detect eye diseases early, because with many, there are no warning signs. Talk to your eye care professional about how often you should have one. If you want to see what your eye care professional sees during a dilated eye exam, check out NEI’s new eye exam animation!

Live a healthy lifestyle. Eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, managing chronic conditions, and not smoking can lower your risk of eye disease.

Know your family history. Talk to your family members about their eye health history. It’s important to know if anyone has been diagnosed with an eye disease, since many are hereditary. This will help to determine if you are at higher risk for developing an eye disease yourself.

Use protective eyewear. Protect your eyes when doing chores around the house, playing sports, or on the job to prevent eye injuries from happening. This includes wearing safety glasses, goggles, safety shields, and eye guards that are made of polycarbonate.

Wear sunglasses. When purchasing sunglasses, look for ones that block out 99 to 100% of both UVA and UVB radiation, so you can keep your eyes healthy. Prolonged exposure to sunlight can increase your risk for getting an eye disease. A wide-brimmed hat offers great protection, too!

These steps can help you keep your eyes healthy and prevent vision loss and blindness from eye disease.

To learn more about Healthy Vision Month and find additional eye health information, visit www.nei.nih.gov/hvm and schedule a visit for a comprehensive eye exam and to speak with your eye care doctor at SJEA.

7 Things You’re Doing At Your Desk That Will Give You Eye Strain

7 Things You Are Doing at Your Desk That Will Give You Eye Strain

South Jersey Eye Associates Sponsors Gloucester County D-Day Softball Tournament

SJEA_VETSports_thSouth Jersey Eye Associates is proud to have been a contributing sponsor of the Gloucester County D-Day Softball Tournament on Saturday, June 6. The event was hosted by the Rowan College at Gloucester County Student Veterans Organization (SVO). The day began with a Parade at 10am followed by the three game Tournament starting at 2pm. Teams included: 1) VETSports Wounded National Team; 2) Pitman BLAZE; and 3) The Rowan College at Gloucester County Legends of Roadrunner Baseball Team.

“Our Eyes As We Age” with Dr. Feinstein

DTRC 2010 Events

Dr. Feinstein had the pleasure of visiting with the Downe Township Seniors on Friday, June 12th and presented a talk on “Our Eyes As We Age”. Thank you to all the attendees who participated in this event.