Dr. Wuzzardo Rides In American Cancer Society Bike-a-thon

South Jersey Eye Associates’ very own Dr. Brandon Wuzzardo, along with his girlfriend Kayla, will be riding in the American Cancer Society Philadelphia to Atlantic City Bike-a-thon on Sunday, June 10, 2018.

The American Cancer Society has contributed to a 20 percent decline in cancer death rates in the US since the early 1990s. That means they’ve helped save nearly 1.2 million lives during that time, thanks in part to people like you who make a donation. Consider donating today.

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June is Cataract Awareness Month. Take Action Today.

Cataracts are a leading cause of blindness among older adults in the United States and more than half of all Americans have cataracts by the time they are 80 years old.

The most common symptoms of a cataract include cloudy or blurry vision, colors seem faded, poor night vision, and double vision.

To delay a cataract, South Jersey Eye Associates recommends:

  • Wearing sunglasses and a hat with a brim to block ultraviolet rays from the sun.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Have a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year.
    Your doctor can check for signs of cataract and other age-related eye problems such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

TAKE ACTION DURING CATARACT AWARENESS MONTH.
Schedule an eye exam, follow our lifestyle recommendations, and spread the word to your family, friends, and colleagues.

Early treatment may save your vision and theirs.

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May is Healthy Vision Month. Healthy Eyes Start With a Dilated Eye Exam

Getting a comprehensive dilated eye exam is one of the best things you can do to keep your eyes healthy. In this painless procedure, an eye care professional examines your eyes to look for common vision problems and eye diseases, many of which have no early warning signs.

Different from the basic eye exam one has to get for glasses or contact lenses, comprehensive dilated eye exams can help protect your sight by making sure you are seeing your best and detecting eye diseases in their early stages, before vision loss has occurred.

A comprehensive dilated eye exam includes the following:
Dilation—Drops are placed in your eyes to dilate, or widen, the pupils. Your eye care professional uses a special magnifying lens to examine your retina to look for signs of damage and other eye problems, such as diabetic retinopathy or age-related macular degeneration. A dilated eye exam also allows your doctor to check for damage to the optic nerve that occurs when a person has glaucoma. After the examination, your close-up vision may remain blurred for several hours.
Tonometry—This test helps to detect glaucoma by measuring eye pressure. Your eye care professional may direct a quick puff of air onto the eye, or gently apply a pressure-sensitive tip near or against the eye. Numbing drops may be applied to your eye for this test. Elevated pressure is a possible sign of glaucoma.
Visual field test—This test measures your side (peripheral) vision. It helps your eye care professional find out if you have lost side vision, a sign of glaucoma.
Visual acuity test—This eye chart test measures how well you see at various distances.

To learn more about comprehensive dilated eye exams, common vision problems, and eye disease, visit http://www.nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes, and schedule your comprehensive eye exam today.

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April is Women’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month at Prevent Blindness, Putting Focus on Special Visual Needs of Women

National Non-Profit Group Seeks to Educate Women on Ways to Protect Healthy Vision

CHICAGO (March 27, 2018) – In addition to the many differences between men and women, more women than men have eye disease. Eye diseases include age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma and dry eye. Women also may have vision issues related to pregnancy and menopause. According to the Prevent Blindness study, The Future of Vision: Forecasting the Prevalence and Costs of Vision Problems, currently 63 percent of those that are blind and 62 percent of those that are visually impaired are women.

Prevent Blindness has designated April as Women’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month in an effort to educate women about these issues as well as provide recommendations on the best ways to take care of vision.

Women are also at higher risk for Dry Eye Disease, a condition where the eyes do not produce enough tears or enough quality tears to keep the eyes lubricated. Dry Eye is more prevalent in women in the menopausal and postmenopausal age group, due to the changes in balance of hormones. Women who are pregnant, or on certain types of birth control, may experience dry eye.

Symptoms of dry eye include:
• Feeling a burning or stinging in your eyes
• Feeling like there are particles in your eyes
• A gritty, sandy feeling in your eyes
• Itchiness
• Redness and inflammation of your eyes
• Stringy mucus in your eyes
• Extreme sensitivity, especially to cigarette smoke

Anyone experiencing these symptoms, or any other changes in vision, should consult an eyecare professional immediately. Vision loss can be significantly lessened when eye problems are detected and treated early. Prevent Blindness offers a free listing of financial assistance services in English and Spanish at:

https://www.preventblindness.org/vision-care-financial-assistance-information.

For the third consecutive year, OCuSOFT ® Inc., a privately-held eye and skin care company dedicated to innovation in eyelid hygiene and ocular health, will support April’s Women’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month with a donation to Prevent Blindness.

“We want to remind women of every age that the key to healthy vision in the future is taking care of the eyes today,” said Jeff Todd, incoming president and CEO of Prevent Blindness. “Wearing the proper eye protection, quitting smoking, eating healthy foods, and talking to an eyecare professional about any vision changes or changes in medications, are just a few ways to help ensure a lifetime of healthy vision.”

For more information on women’s eye health, including fact sheets on eye diseases, and eye protection, please visit www.preventblindness.org, or call (800) 331-2020.

About Prevent Blindness

Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness is the nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Focused on promoting a continuum of vision care, Prevent Blindness touches the lives of millions of people each year through public and professional education, advocacy, certified vision screening and training, community and patient service programs and research. These services are made possible through the generous support of the American public. Together with a network of affiliates, Prevent Blindness is committed to eliminating preventable blindness in America. For more information, or to make a contribution to the sight-saving fund, call 1-800-331-2020. Or, visit us on the Web at preventblindness.org or facebook.com/preventblindness.

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April is National Women’s Eye Health & Safety Month

Women are more at risk for vision loss from eye diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration. Hormonal changes, age, and smoking can endanger sight.

A comprehensive eye exam is the best way to ensure that your vision is healthy and to help keep it that way.

Schedule your appointment today with one of the caring doctors at SJEA. We look forward to seeing you!

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Spring Fling Eyewear Event for the Entire Family

Join Us! Thursday, April 5th, 1 pm – 6 pm

South Jersey Eye Associates is thinking Spring and celebrating with an eyewear event for the entire family. Join us on April 5th from 1pm-6pm for our Spring Fling. Check out the newest styles in eyewear. Enjoy the special savings being offered that day. Come see for yourself all that SJEA has to offer!

March Is National Save Your Vision Month

Drs. Feinstein and Wuzzardo of South Jersey Eye Associates, in honor of March being National Save Your Vision Month, would like to share 5 tips with you for a lifetime of healthy vision:

1) Schedule yearly comprehensive eye exams
2) Protect your eyes from harmful UV rays
3) Give your eyes a break from digital devices (20-20-20 Rule)
4) Eat your fruits and vegetables, especially your greens!
5) Practice safe wear and care of contact lenses

Want to learn more about saving your vision, 

Video Games and Vision: How Healthy Eyes Can Help Beat Your High Score

South Jersey Eye Associates and the American Optometric Association Share How to Gain a Competitive Advantage by Giving Eyes a Break

[Bridgeton, March 2018] — With the popularity of video games and competitive gaming on the rise, players are always looking for an edge. Whether battling a computer opponent or Player Two, one secret weapon can help land the high score: the American Optometric Association’s (AOA) 20-20-20 rule, which encourages gamers to give their eyes a 20-second rest every 20 minutes.

The AOA’s 2017 American Eye-Q® survey revealed that 41 percent of Americans spend more than four hours a week playing video games. Staring at digital devices can lead to digital eye strain, sleep problems, blurred vision, headaches and neck and shoulder pain, among other things. Yet, only 21 percent of Eye-Q® respondents have talked to an eye health professional about the amount of time spent playing video games.

In addition to encouraging players to discuss game usage with an optometrist, South Jersey Eye Associates is sharing some insider tips on how to help ease eye discomfort during this year’s Save Your Vision Month in March.

  • Level up with the AOA 20-20-20 rule: When you are using any electronic gaming device or computer, make a conscious effort every day to take a 20-second break and look away from the screen, every 20 minutes and view something 20 feet away.
  • Position yourself: Maintain a comfortable working distance from your gaming device by using the zoom feature to see small print and details, rather than bringing the device closer to your eyes.
  • Beat the glare: The AOA recommends reducing the glare by adjusting device settings or using a glare filter to decrease the amount of blue light reflected from the screen.
  • Consider buying protective eyewear: Experiment with blue light filter glasses to limit the blue light beaming from your screen.
  • Power down before you turn in: Turn your digital devices off at least one hour before bed.
  • Schedule an appointment: Contact South Jersey Eye Associates to schedule an appointment for a comprehensive eye exam to detect and address vision problems.

“Those who spend excessive time in front of screens may experience physical discomfort, like the nearly one-third of gamers who reported headaches or blurry vision in our survey,” said Dr. Wuzzardo.

“Save Your Vision Month is the perfect time to prioritize eye health by practicing the 20-20-20 rule,” said Dr. Feinstein.

If you think you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed on the side due to prolonged exposure to digital devices, schedule an appointment with South Jersey Eye Associates. For additional information on how eye health may be impacted while playing video games, please visit www.aoa.org. 

About the American Eye-Q® survey:
The American Optometric Association commissioned a 20-minute, online survey among a nationally-representative sample of n=1,002 U.S. adults ages 18+. The margin of error for this sample is +/-3.1% at the 95% confidence level. The survey was fielded between November 3 and November 9, 2017.

About the American Optometric Association (AOA):
The American Optometric Association, a federation of state, student and armed forces optometric associations, was founded in 1898. Today, the AOA is proud to represent the profession of optometry, America’s family eye doctors, who take a leading role in an individual’s overall eye and vision care, health and well-being. Doctors of optometry (ODs) are the independent primary health care professionals for the eye and have extensive, ongoing training to examine, diagnose, treat and manage disorders, diseases and injuries that affect the eye and visual system, providing two-thirds of primary eye care in the U.S. For information on a variety of eye health and vision topics, and to find an optometrist near you, visit www.aoa.org.

 

Vision Rehabilitation Maximizes Hope and Independence

New studies predict a boom in cases of low vision, but help is available.

As the last of the baby-boom generation approaches the age of 65, the number of cases of visual impairment and blindness is projected to experience a boom of its own in the coming years. According to recent studies funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the number of Americans who are visually impaired—including those with low vision— is expected to double to more than 8 million by 2050.

Learn more by clicking below:

https://www.nei.nih.gov/sites/default/files/nehep-pdfs/LV_Drop_In_Article_ENG.pdf