Vision Rehabilitation Maximizes Hope and Independence

New studies predict a boom in cases of low vision, but help is available.

As the last of the baby-boom generation approaches the age of 65, the number of cases of visual impairment and blindness is projected to experience a boom of its own in the coming years. According to recent studies funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the number of Americans who are visually impaired—including those with low vision— is expected to double to more than 8 million by 2050.

Learn more by clicking below:

https://www.nei.nih.gov/sites/default/files/nehep-pdfs/LV_Drop_In_Article_ENG.pdf

February Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration & Low Vision Awareness Month

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss for individuals age 50 and older. In its earliest stages, AMD can be difficult to diagnose. In some cases, AMD progresses so slowly that many do not notice a change in their vision. In other cases, the deterioration is very rapid and can appear to happen overnight. 

Low Vision is a term used to describe significant vision impairment that cannot be corrected with glasses, surgery, or medication. Most people develop low vision because of eye diseases and health conditions like macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetes. While the condition isn’t reversible, medical care, support, and rehabilitation can help patients make the most of their remaining vision and enable them to attain a higher quality of life.



South Jersey Eye Associates offers both Low Vision Assessments and Rehabilitative Services designed to help our patients recover independence lost due to vision impairment. We are dedicated to providing patients with the expertise, information, and support they need to meet the challenges that Low Vision presents in their day-to-day lives.

January is Glaucoma Awareness Month. Start the New Year Off Right.

As you plan for a healthier new year, why not add this sight-saving exercise to your list of resolutions: Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam. It’s the only way to find out for sure whether you have glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness in America.

An eye disease that can rob you of your vision, glaucoma often comes with no early warning. No pain. No discomfort. No blurry vision. Nearly 3 million people have glaucoma, yet half don’t know they have it.

Glaucoma starts with a buildup of fluid that increases the pressure in your eye and can cause damage to the optic nerve, the bundle of nerve fibers that transfers visual images to your brain. Glaucoma first affects your peripheral, or side, vision. As the disease advances, more noticeable vision loss will occur, and if not controlled, the disease can lead to permanent vision loss and blindness.

Are you at higher risk for glaucoma? You could be if you:

• Are African American and age 40 or older
• Are over age 60, especially if you are Hispanic/Latino
• Have a family history of the disease

Everyone, especially those at higher risk, should make it a point to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam every year as recommended by your doctor here at South Jersey Eye Associates. Early detection and treatment are the best ways to control glaucoma.

This year, make a resolution for healthier vision. Make sure your eyes are healthy and you are seeing your best in the new year. Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam and encourage your friends and loved ones to do the same.

This message is provided with the support National Eye Health Education Program.

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Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam to see well for a lifetime

Aging is a process that brings about many opportunities and changes, from major transformations, such as becoming a grandparent or going back to school to simple lifestyle changes, such as starting a new exercise program. Don’t miss out on any of these opportunities. Take stock of your eye health to make sure your eyes are healthy and you are seeing your best.

While vision loss and blindness are not a normal part of aging, some vision changes such as losing focus, having trouble distinguishing between colors such as blue and black, and needing more light to see well are common. These changes can often be corrected with contact lenses or glasses and improved lighting.

People are also at higher risk for vision loss from certain eye diseases and conditions as they age, including the following:

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which gradually destroys the macula (the part of the eye that provides sharp, central vision)
  • Cataract, a clouding of the lens in the eye
  • Diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that damages blood vessels in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye)
  • Glaucoma, a group of diseases that can cause uid and pressure to build up in the eye and damage the optic nerve
  • Low vision, a visual impairment that cannot be corrected by regular glasses, contact lenses, medication, or surgery that interferes with the ability to perform everyday activities
  • Dry eye, a condition that occurs when the eye does not produce tears properly or when tears evaporate too quickly

September is Healthy Aging® Month

For more information, visit www.nei.nih.gov/agingeye

A program of the National Institutes of Health

South Jersey Refractive Eye Surgeons

The South Jersey refractive eye surgeons at South Jersey Eye Associates can help with such specialized eye care problems as nearsightedness and farsightedness at their comprehensive eye care center. When you require preventive eye care, eye examinations, and eye treatment as well as help with other specific eye care issues, we are the vision eye care specialists in South Jersey for you.

Few South Jersey refractive eye surgeons can help with vision eye care as part of their comprehensive eye care center as well as the team at South Jersey Eye Associates. Our professionals can help vision eye care problems with a series of preventive eye care, eye examinations, and eye treatment.  Our role as top vision eye care specialists in South Jersey is important to us.

When You Need South Jersey Refractive Eye Surgeons

For people who are nearsighted and need help with vision eye care, certain refractive surgery techniques will reduce the curvature of a cornea that is too steep so that the eye’s focusing power is lessened. Images that are focused in front of the retina, due to a longer eye or steep corneal curve, are pushed closer to or directly onto the retina following surgery.

The South Jersey refractive eye surgeons at South Jersey Eye Associates offer both assessments and rehabilitative services designed to help our patients recover independence lost due to vision impairment. We also help with vision eye care in relation to many eye issues.

Farsighted people with vision eye care problems will have refractive surgery procedures that achieve a steeper cornea to increase the eye’s focusing power. Images that are focused beyond the retina, due to a short eye or flat cornea, will be pulled closer to or directly onto the retina after surgery.

If you need medical support from South Jersey refractive eye surgeons as you are dealing with vision eye care problems, the comprehensive eye care center at South Jersey Eye Associates is where you should go. Count on our team of vision eye care specialists in South Jersey for your preventive eye care, eye examinations, and eye treatment.

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Solar Eclipse Safety: American Optometric Association Encourages Safe and Fun Viewing of August Eclipse

South Jersey Eye Associates, PA Wants to Help You Take in the Stellar Moment

On August 21, a total solar eclipse will touch the U.S. mainland for the first time since 1979, following a path that crosses the country from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Tens of millions of people who live within a 70-mile radius of its cross-country track will witness the eclipse in totality (the sun completely blocked by the moon) while millions of others outside of it will enjoy a partial eclipse. The American Optometric Association (AOA), America’s family eye doctors, is urging Americans to view the eclipse with proper eye protection to avoid any temporary or permanent eye damage from the sun.

“The eclipse is a rare moment that the whole country is able to share,” said Dr. Brandon Wuzzardo.

“As America’s primary eye health and vision care experts, doctors of optometry like ourselves are excited to help everyone enjoy it safely by protecting their eyes,” added Dr. Michael Feinstein.

To ensure spectators won’t miss the remarkable sight, the AOA is sharing a few tips for safe viewing:

  • Get centered and enjoy the view. Within the path of totality, you can safely witness the two or more minutes when the moon completely covers the sun with the naked eye. Otherwise, your eyes should always be protected by verified viewing tools. Never look directly at the sun without eye protection, even briefly. Visit aas.org to access eclipse duration charts.
  • Know your duration. Outside of the path of totality, always use solar filters. O.D.s want to reinforce that the only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters or other ISO-certified filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers. The AOA encourages ordering solar eclipse glasses in advance and recommends referring to the American Astronomical Society’s (AAS) site for a list of manufacturers.
  • Be aware of harmful solar exposure. If you stare at the sun without protection, you may experience damage to your retina (the tissue at the back of your eye) called “solar retinopathy.” This damage can occur without any sensation of pain, since the retina does not have pain receptors. The injury can be temporary or permanent. Visit your local doctor of optometry immediately if an accident occurs.
  • Visit your doctor of optometry. Check in with South Jersey Eye Associates at 856-455-5500 or visit southjerseyeye.com for information about safely viewing the eclipse. If you experience any problems with your eyes or vision after the eclipse, our office will be able to provide you with the medical care you need.

To access additional information and educational materials on the solar eclipse, visit aoa.org/2017eclipse.

 

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